Monthly Archives: February 2009

I HATE ORAL ENGLISH EXAMS

Standard

DON’T STRESS ME OUT

 

I HATE ORAL ENGLISH EXAMS

 

Oral Exam Interventions 3, 4, 5

The Oral Exam is an opportunity for you to demonstrate your knowledge, your presentation/speaking skills, as well as your ability to communicate.  They can also be good practice for developing body language, projection and message delivery. 

HERE IS A LIST OF POSSIBLE ALTERNATIVES THAT YOU MAY WANT TO TAKE IN ORDER TO PRESENT YOUR ORAL EXAM IN ENGLISH LITERATURE CLASS WITH MR.MRTZ.

 

REQUIREMENT>

The assessment technique MUST BE CONNECTED TO THE READING SELECTIONS FROM ENGLISH LITERATURE CLASS DURING 2008/2009

PAIR/GROUP WORK> Teacher will provide one hour class for rehearsal and planning. It is solely student’s responsibility to adopt and accept school rules about group work or pair work.

 

Assessment Techniques

News Channel (report) TV Commercials

Students will present news from different sections. They must connect one of the three stories the necklace, Helen on 86th Street and Martin Luther King. They may include TV commercials. News broadcasting (also known as newscast or newsbreak) is the broadcasting of various news events and other information via television or radio. The content is usually either produced locally in a newsroom, or by a broadcast network.

 

Parody

Student will recreate one story from a comic and entertaining perspective. By changing some names, events and objects, the performers will offer a new version of the story. The message must be kept intact. The reader or audience is privileged to know how the story begins, progresses and ends. If you see a parody and you may have not seen the original version, then the true might be distorted. Here is a definition from the dictionary>   

  1.  
    1. A literary or artistic work that imitates the characteristic style of an author or a work for comic effect or ridicule. caricature.

Story Adaptation to Modern Times

In this category, student may rewrite the scripts of the story and adapted to new and modern times as it has been in Romeo and Juliet in Hollywood studios. We may want to say a reloaded version of an old piece. It has to be attached to the message and authors intentions.

 

 

Talk Show

You may have heard of The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Jerry Springer Show y Geraldo, Laura en America, El Show de Cristina, 90, Jaime Baily, or Reality Show among others. A talk show (American) or chat show (Global) is a television or radio program where one person or group of people come together to discuss various topics put forth by a talk show host. Sometimes, talk shows feature a panel of guests, usually consisting of a group of people who are learned or who have great experience in relation to whatever issue is being discussed on the show for that episode. Other times, a single guest discusses their work or area of expertise with a host or co-hosts. A call-in show takes live phone calls from callers listening at home, in their cars, etc. Another variation could be TV SHOWS like Harry Hill’s TV Burp is a popular BAFTA award-winning British television comedy programme, produced by Avalon Television for ITV, and is hosted by the comedian Harry Hill. The show presents a satirical look at the previous week’s television, including extracts from TV shows with added sketches, observational voice-overs, and guest appearances.

 

Puppets

Students will recreate one story with puppets. They may imitate and change voices to make it a little bit funny and to protect their identities.A puppet is an inanimate object or representational figure animated or manipulated by a puppeteer. It is usually (but by no means always) a depiction of a human character, and is used in puppetry, a play or a presentation that is a very ancient form of theatre. The puppet undergoes a process of transformation through being animated, and is normally manipulated by at least one puppeteer.

 

There are many different varieties of puppets, and they are made of a wide range of materials, depending on their form and intended use. They can be extremely complex or very simple in their construction. They may even be found objects. As Oscar Wilde wrote, “There are many advantages in puppets. They never argue. They have no crude views about art. They have no private lives”. David Currell has said “A puppet is not an actor and a puppet theatre is not human theatre in miniature, because when an actor ‘represents’, a puppet ‘is'”

 

 

Musical Hall (music is on backstage)

Music hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which was popular between 1850 and 1960. The term can refer to

  1. A particular form of variety entertainment involving a mixture of popular song, comedy and specialty acts. British music hall was similar to American vaudeville, featuring rousing songs and comic acts, while in the United Kingdom the term vaudeville referred to more lowbrow entertainment that would have been termed burlesque.
  2. The theatre or other venue in which such entertainment takes place;
  3. The type of popular music normally associated with such performances.

One well known spectacle is High School Musical in which performers act, dance and talk. Off/Broadway stories on stage with singing, performing and dancing.

 

 

Character Up/Close

Students might analyze a character through his her different features. Physical and personality traits may provide a picture of the character. Student may take a role or produce a monologue of any character of any story. Costume and great creativity must be the key. IN OTHER WORDS TO EMBODY A CHARACTER.

Character up close>EXAMPLE>Macbeth is nobleman and a Scottish general in the king’s army. At the beginning of the play, he has gained recognition for himself through his defeat of the king of Norway and the rebellious Macdowald. Shortly after the battle, Macbeth and another of the king’s general’s, Banquo, encounter three witches (or weird sisters) who greet Macbeth as thane of Glamis, thane of Cawdor, and future king. Macbeth, unaware that King Duncan has bestowed upon him the title thane of Cawdor, appears to be startled by these prophesies. As soon as the witches finish addressing Macbeth, Banquo asks him, “why…

 

Debate on Specific Topics> racism, honesty, truth, wishes, acceptance.

Students will discuss about the moral lesson of the stories. They will reflect upon the actions of the characters and how the author may or may not influence the readers. Some decisions that were taken by the characters must be analyzed and then converse about. The parties (people on each side) will defend their positions, by proposing and showing evidence from the story and connected to real life experiences. The debate must be centered on respect and purposeful understanding.  

 

 

Improvisation Sketch

This is a chance to outburst your talent in improvisation. Students will draw a character or idea from a bag. She will have to make it alive for the audience. Performers may have two or three associates that may interfere or help in the conversation. The aim is to show all acting and speaking skills at hand.

 

Giving a Speech

After searching for info from varied sources, students will give a speech about the required topic. The speech must follow the intention to convince the audience and make them reflect about and ideal, conviction or simply present a point of view in regards to certain topics. Body language, intonation, security and projection of voice and message are accountable for the assessment.

 

CONNECTION TOPICS

A SOUND OF THUNDER

SCIENCE FICTION

CLIMAX

TIME MACHINES

MAKING / CORRECTING MISTAKES

POISON

SUSPENSE

COLONIALISM IN INDIA

GREAT BRITAIN

SNAKES

THANK YOU MA’M

CHARACTERIZATION

CRIME

NEW YORK

THE GIFT OF THE MAGI

CHRISTMAS

PRESENTS

IRONY

THE NECKLACE

PARIS

FASHION

HONESTY

HELEN ON 86TH STREET

WISHES

FATHER OR MOTHER DESSERTION

TROY

GODESSES

GREECE

MARTIN LUTHER KING. JR.

RACISM

HUMAN RIGHTS MOVEMENTS

MUSIC

MOVIES

LIST SOME OTHER TOPICS THAT MAY ADDRESS THE READING SELECTIONS>

BECOME LITERATE

Standard

Becoming Literate

Some suggestions for writing about literacy . . .

 

Though the people depicted in The Odyssey may be illiterate, they are by no means “primitive.” They have a sophisticated sense of relationship to their land, to their past, and to each other. They have a complex political and economic system with various classes bound in a web of loyalties to family, clan, and king. Most of all, they have a profoundly rich set of answers to the fundamental questions of life — Why do we live, and why do we die? Why is there suffering, and why is there joy? Where did we come from, and where will we go? All people everywhere ask the same basic questions, and they look to their culture for answers. An evolving culture, then, is an evolving set of questions and attempts to answer those questions.

The Odyssey represents a unique transition between the illiterate, mythic, “pre-historic” period of Greek culture, and the literate, well-documented Greece that is the direct ancestor of modern Western civilization. That is, The Odyssey was probably composed as far back as the eighth century B.C., well before any working alphabet had been adopted for the Greek language; however, the text of the poem obviously does now exist in written form, and may represent not only the original oral Odyssey, first written down in about the sixth century B.C., but also later additions and emendations.

The poem gives us a wonderful record of a time before record-keeping — a time when “history” was an ongoing tradition of stories, poems, and songs. In fact, there seems to have been little or no distinction in people’s minds between “history,” “fable,” “art,” “religion,” and “philosophy,” or even between “reality” and “fiction.” If something could exist in the imagination, then it was “real” in the only way that mattered to the Greeks, and if it could be remembered and passed along from one imagination to another, then it could become part of the culture, part of what would later be called “literature.”

 

Paper 2, “Becoming Literate,” calls on you to think about the way that a culture changes — and, in some ways, doesn’t change — when its language attains written form. Suddenly all sorts of new questions arise: When is something important enough to record in writing . . . or, sometimes, when is something unimportant enough to record in writing, rather than commit to memory? Who gets to learn the skills of reading and writing, and what kind of status is gained, or lost? What happens to the culture’s (or the individual’s) powers of memory and imagination? How are the lines between truth and non-truth redrawn?

To develop Paper 2, you’ll need to do two things. First, use techniques of listing, clustering, and/or freewriting to explore what happened when you learned to read and write. What was that like? How profoundly did it change you and your sense of the world, of what was important and what was unimportant? Once you get started, you’ll soon find that you have a wealth of material to draw from! Then, second, choose one particular culture and find at least one authoritative source of information in order to learn how that culture made the transition to literacy, and how this changed the culture. You don’t have to write a full-blown research paper, but you do have to find enough facts that you can tell that story in about 500 words.

Now you’re ready to put Paper 2 together. Begin by thinking about the two stories — your own and that of some particular culture — and when you’ve found an especially interesting point of comparison, begin your draft by writing the part of your story that is relevant (perhaps 250 words or so), then continue with the historical story you’ve learned about, and conclude with some analysis that compares (and/or contrasts) the two stories.

 

Here are some ideas that might be useful, though you certainly aren’t limited to these!

  • Some of the very oldest forms of writing were developed in the Middle East — by the Egyptians, the Sumerians, the Hebrews, and the Phoenicians. These cultures borrowed heavily from each other, and in each case writing was very much associated with spiritual authorities. You might want to look, for example, at the Old Testament, and discuss how the ancient Hebrews developed the Jewish religion with its all-important Torah. What kind of culture evolves from a religion based on scripture rather than oral tradition? What did it mean in your own life to learn to read the “word of God”? 
  • Christianity presents an interesting case: here, the life and sayings of a presumably illiterate carpenter were recorded decades and even centuries after his death — “recorded,” though, not in the Aramaic language that Jesus probably spoke, but in Greek (which was the intellectual “lingua franca” of that era, much as Latin was the universal intellectual language of medieval Europe, or as English is today’s international language of technology and commerce). The Bible, as we know it today, represents many layers of translation from one language (and culture) to our own, and some scholars see it as a kind of pastiche; nevertheless, many Christians consider the modern Bible, even in English, to be the authoritative voice of God. The Gospel according to John opens, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” What happens when key ideas are translated from one language to another — can they maintain their integrity, or do they become colored with the culture of the new language? Does this matter?

 

  • The ancient Egyptians used stylized pictures, called “hieroglyphs,” to depict their language, and so did the ancient Chinese, using the symbols we now call “characters.” You might explore the contrast between forms of writing that depict ideas in pictorial form, and forms of writing (like the Roman alphabet we use for English) that depict sounds. Some languages, like those of the ancient Mayans or the modern Japanese, combine ideographic and phonetic symbols in their writing. How does writing translate the inner world of thoughts and sounds to a visible outer form?

 

  • Whereas some cultures have developed literacy “organically” (from within their own traditions and for their own purposes), most have had literacy thrust on them by outsiders, such as conquerors or missionaries. In these cases, learning to read has meant acquiring new religions, new political systems, and new technologies. For example, Christian missionaries brought literacy to northern Europe, most of Africa, and all of the Americas. What happens when a new culture of literacy supplants an older, pre-literate culture? What happens when people such as refugees or economic migrants move into a new culture and have to learn to read in order to survive?

 

  • When people learn to read and write in their own language, they normally have at least four or five years’ worth of experience speaking that language; it’s curious, then, that people learning a second language usually learn to speak it and read it at the same time. In what ways do reading and writing help us in learning a language, and in what ways do they hinder us? How does learning a second language reinforce or alter our understanding of our mother tongue?

 

© Michael Fleming

San Francisco, California

February, 1998